Blossman Propane Gas, Alliance & Service

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BLOSSMAN SMALL ENGINE CONVERSIONS FINDS ITS STRIDE WITH CREATION AND CONVERSION OF MOWERS


Manufacturers of lawn care equipment are expanding the range of their propane-powered product offerings to meet the growing demand for cleaner lawn-care alternatives, and Blossman Gas is leading the way. The conversion of mowers to propane has the potential to significantly reduce greenhouse gas emissions, reduce costs, and prolong the life of the mower’s engine.

Major small-engine manufacturers such as Briggs and Stratton, Kohler and Kawasaki, understand the benefits of clean-burning propane and are offering propane warranties with their products. Blossman’s pilot programs with universities and small businesses in the Southeast demonstrate the benefits, both economic and environmental, for this rapidly growing market.

Blossman’s top 8 markets in mower conversions are currently located in: Gordonsville, VA; Gastonia, NC; Douglasville, GA; Bedford, VA; Newnan, GA; Anderson, SC; Hendersonville, NC; and Boone, NC. “We are pleased to see these branches connecting with local landscaping companies to create a win-win for their communities,” notes Steve McCoy, Regional VP, Blossman Gas.

New technology applications for small engines are meeting and exceeding EPA standards:

- Compared with gasoline powered machines, propane mowers offer up to 74 percent reduction in greenhouse gas emissions

- Ethanol in gasoline is a main source for small engine failure, a problem that can be eliminated with propane

- More than 98 percent of propane used today is produced in the U.S.

- Propane can be stored for up to 40 years without going stale or evaporating like gasoline

- Propane will extend engine life and reduce routine maintenance costs

- Commercial lawn care providers can save more than a dollar per gallon versus the price of gasoline

Landscape contractors who bought a propane-fueled mower in 2012 reported a fuel cost savings of nearly 39 percent compared to those who used gasoline and 60 percent compared to diesel, according to a new study from the Propane Education and Research Council (PERC). According to PERC, contractors were “very satisfied” with propane-fueled mowers. Ninety percent of the contractors who participated in the study say they were likely to choose a propane mower again. All participants indicated they would recommend propane mowers to others.